French Angelfish

The French angelfish (Pomacanthus paru) is a species of fish found in the Western Atlantic from New York to Brazil. The French angelfish is common in shallow reefs, occurs usually in pairs often near sea fans. It feeds on sponges, algae, bryozoans, zoantharians, gorgonians, and tunicates. Sponges constitute 70% of the species’ diet and since sponges are plentiful the fish is normally well fed. It covers sponge pieces in thick mucous to help digestion. Juveniles have “cleaning stations” where they clean a broad range of fish, including jacks, snappers, morays, grunts, surgeonfishes, and wrasses.

The adult background coloration is black but the scales of the body, except those at the front from nape to abdomen, are rimmed with golden yellow. Furthermore, the pectoral fins have a broad orange-yellow bar, the dorsal filament is yellow, the chin is whitish, the outer part of the iris is yellow, and the eye is narrowly rimmed below with blue. Juveniles are black with vertical yellow bands.

They have a maximum size of 15 inches and their intolerable nature of their own kind, we recommend you to keep only one of them in an aquarium in a large tank of minimum 180 gallon with large amount of live rocks for hiding and grazing. French Angelfish is not a good reef compatible candidate as they like to nip at soft corals, clam mantles and stony corals, and anything that may look like substrates such as seahorses, frogfish, or scorpionfish.  They should be fed an omnivorous diet, these French Angelfish feed on polyps, sponges, algae and corals in the wild along with meaty foods like mysis shrimp or krill. French Angelfish is an egg-laying species that scatters eggs. Beautify the view of your aquarium adding this impressive French Angelfish. This hardy species requires a moderate care level and a water condition of 72-78 degree Fahrenheit with a maintained pH between 8.1-8.4.

French angelfish are popular on the market. The flesh has a rich taste making it an excellent source of food.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s